Arrow War: an Anglo-Chinese confusion, 1856-1860.
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Arrow War: an Anglo-Chinese confusion, 1856-1860. by Douglas Hurd

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Published by Macmillan in New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • China

Subjects:

  • China -- History -- Foreign intervention, 1857-1861.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Bibliography: p. 245-246.

Classifications
LC ClassificationsDS760 .H8 1968
The Physical Object
Pagination254 p.
Number of Pages254
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5612784M
LC Control Number68020747

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The Arrow War: an Anglo-Chinese confusion, [Hurd, Douglas] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The Arrow War: an Anglo-Chinese confusion, Author: Douglas Hurd. Very Good. Hurd, Douglas. The Arrow War: An Anglo-Chinese Confusion new york: MacMillan, pp. Indexed. Illustrated. 8vo. Scarlet cloth with gilt lettering on backstrip. Book condition: Very good with subtly bumped corners and small chip out of bottom edge of front free endsheet.5/5(1). Get this from a library! The Arrow War: an Anglo-Chinese confusion, [Douglas Hurd] -- "On the morning of October 8, , a small vessel flying the British flag under charter, with a Chinese crew, was seized by the Chinese. The relatively minor incident was to trigger an imperialistic. The `Arrow' was a boat called a lorcha with a Chinese crew of about fourteen and a young Irish master; registered in Hong Kong, she counted as a British ship and flew the Red En- sign. One day in October , while lying of the Canton waterfront, she was boarded by an official posse of Chinese; her native crew were arrested and the Red Ensign.

Buy The Arrow War: An Anglo-Chinese confusion, First edition, first impression by Hurd, Douglas (ISBN:) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible s: 1. Other articles where Arrow War is discussed: Opium Wars: The second Opium War: In the mids, while the Qing government was embroiled in trying to quell the Taiping Rebellion (–64), the British, seeking to extend their trading rights in China, found an excuse to renew hostilities. In early October some Chinese officials boarded the.   John Wong's study of the Arrow or Second Opium War provides almost everything one expects to find in consequential historical scholarship: prodigious research, acute analysis, methodical organization, evenhanded judgments, and lucid Dreams seeks to establish the causes of that conflict by painstakingly untangling the tortuous thicket of interests, events, and personalities that.  , The Arrow War: An Anglo-Chinese Confusion, – (London, ), p. Hurd further maintains that Earl gave evidence seven months after the incident, giving as reference F.O. If one compares his reference with that in my footnotes, it is clear that Mr Hurd has not read the documents himself (see notes no. 30 and 33–34).Cited by:

Deadly Dreams: Opium, Imperialism and the Arrow War () in China J. Y. Wong Many have accepted that the Arrow War () was caused by an insult to . The Arrow War: An Anglo-Chinese Confusion, Chauncey S. Goodrich & Douglas Hurd. Journal of the American Oriental Society 90 (2) About the Confusion Between the Course of Time and the Arrow of Time. Étienne Klein - - Foundations of Science 12 (3) Cited by: 9. In the first two parts of this seven-part book, Wong endeavors "to find out what actually happened” (p. 42). He begins by chiding former British Foreign Secretary Douglas Hurd's The Arrow War: An Anglo-Chinese Confusion,arguing that the confusion of the subtitle is endemic in research and suggesting that a. Many have accepted that the Arrow War () was caused by an insult to the British flag belonging to the pirate boat Arrow. Dr. Wong argues that Britain's reliance on the opium trade with China played a far greater role in pushing the diplomatic conflict into war. The war was not a simple.